Silver State Industries

Frequently Asked Questions
Q: When I take my adopted horse home, what should I expect?
Q: When and where will information about upcoming adoptions be posted?
Q: When are adoptions held?
Q: Why can’t I where blue jeans to the Correctional Center?
Q: Can I bring my children to adoption events at the Correctional Center?
Q: Can we preview the horses available for adoption before the sale date?
Q: How do I pre-qualify to bid on a horse?
Q: Do I have to be present to adopt a wild horse? Can I send my friend?
Q: What is the average sale price of horses trained by prison inmates?
Q: How much training do the horses actually have?
Q: What are the facility requirements?
Q: Do I have to pick up the horse I adopt the day of the adoption?
Q: Can I get a refund or exchange my adopted horse for another in the future?

Q: When I take my adopted horse home, what should I expect?
A: Here is some “sage” advice from Hank Curry, Trainer.

These horses are green-broke. They are for the most part very gentle. But they may overreact to new objects and appear spooked until they decide it will not harm them. (A spooky object could be anything they haven’t seen before. It may not be scary to you, but could be very scary to them. For example, they have seen a wheel barrow but not a bicycle. They have seen men on foot but not a man carrying a backpack. They have little contact with women and are sensitive to perfumes or hairspray. Their sense of smell is sensitive and so is their hearing.)

If you haven’t ridden your horse for about a week, double check yourself, your horse and your equipment before you go for a ride. The following steps are important:

1. Catch your horse. When you want to catch your horse, indicate to the animal that you want to catch him. Don’t hide the halter or try to sneak around. Take your time petting establishes confidence, and the horse should willingly accept the halter.

2. Basic ground work and drills. With the halter on your horse, ask him to lead, back up, yield his shoulders, and yield his hip. Repeat these drills until the horse is respectful and responsive. The horse will usually drop his head, blink, chew or possibly all three. At this point, you are taking command. Be sure to pet the horse when he gives a good response.

3. Lunging. Lunging your horse is a good exercise and a means of showing the horse you have control. Put him through his gaits: walk, trot, canter and stop, back up. Reverse directions. When the horse gets to be responsive, he is starting the warming-up process. Now would be a good time to groom him and saddle-up.

4. Warm Up. Lunge the horse both ways, stop, back up. Reverse directions and repeat stop, back up. Now put a snaffle bit on your horse and repeat these lunging exercises. Now tighten the cinch on your saddle and repeat. If the horse responds well to “whoa”, reverses and backs easily, he is probably ready to ride.

5. Warm Up Area. Use a good solid corral. If a round pen is not available, you may use a square pen but a somewhat restricted area will help you control the horse. When the horse is respectful and responds well…Enjoy Your Ride!

Q: When and where will information about upcoming adoptions be posted?
A: Interested adopters can find a catalog posted on the BLM Nevada web site (www.blm.gov/nv) about one month prior to the adoption event. The catalog includes a description and photograph of each animal.

Q: When are adoptions held?
A: Adoptions are generally held on the second Saturday in October and February, and the last Saturday in May or the first Saturday of June. A special saddle trained horse adoption is also normally held the third Saturday in August in association with the Western States WH&B Show at the Livestock Events Center in Reno.

Q: Why can’t I where blue jeans to the Correctional Center?
A: This is a security issue and for the public’s personal safety. Prison inmates wear blue jeans that allow security guards to readily distinguish between inmates and the public.

Q: Can I bring my children to adoption events at the Correctional Center?
A: Yes. However, children may not wear blue clothing either. Additionally, parents are responsible for assuring their children remain with them at all times.

Q: Can we preview the horses available for adoption before the sale date?
A: No. Since this a prison facility horses cannot be viewed until 9:00 a.m. the morning of the adoption.

Q: How do I pre-qualify to bid on a horse?
A: You can pre-qualify in two ways:
(1) print a copy of BLM’s adoption application here , fill it out completely, and bring a copy of your completed application with you the day of the adoption;
(2) fill out an adoption application the day of the adoption. Once your application has been reviewed and approved, you will be issued a bidder card and will be eligible to bid.

Q: Do I have to be present to adopt a wild horse? Can I send my friend?
A: You must be present to adopt a wild horse. You cannot send a family member or a friend.

Q: What is the average sale price of horses trained by prison inmates?
A: Prices vary widely. The starting bid for any wild horse is $150. Bids of $2,000-$4,000 are not uncommon. However, the average price is about $800 to $1,200 per animal. It really depends on how many people are interested in one particular animal.

Q: How much training do the horses actually have?
A: These horses are green-broke which means they have received 120 days of training by the prison inmates. These horses will continue to need daily training to reinforce the basics they have learned.

Q: What are the facility requirements?
A: Although these horses are green broke, each horse should be kept in a pen no larger than 20’ X 20’ until the animal gets used to its new surroundings and you. The corral should be at least 5-feet high and of heavy duty construction using poles, pipes, or planks with at least 1 ½ inch thickness and without dangerous protrusions. Barbed wire and large-mesh-woven, stranded, and electric materials are unacceptable for fencing.
You must also provide shelter from inclement weather and temperature extremes for your adopted wild horse. The shelter must have, at a minimum, two sides with a roof, good drainage, adequate ventilation, and access for the animal. Tarps are not acceptable.

Q: Do I have to pick up the horse I adopt the day of the adoption?
A: BLM prefers you take the horse home that day, but special arrangements can be made with the prison to pick up the animal in a couple of days.

Q: Can I get a refund or exchange my adopted horse for another in the future?
A: No refunds, credits or exchanges will be approved. For more information on this policy, or about adopting a prison-trained horse, please call:
John Axtell, BLM-Nevada Carson City District Office, (775) 885-6146.

Contact Us
Ranch Manager
Justin Pope

Office: (775) 887-9331
Fax: (775) 888-8518
jpope@doc.nv.gov

Address:
P.O. Box 7000
Carson City, NV 89701
 

Northern Nevada
Marketing Coordinator
Bill Quenga


Cell: (775) 848-2457
Office: (775) 887-3331
Office: (775) 887-3309
Fax: (775) 883-6263
wquenga@doc.nv.gov
Address:
5500 Snyder Ave.
Bldg. 17, 2nd Floor
Carson City, NV 89701

Southern Nevada
Marketing Coordinator
Craig Korsgaard


Cell (702) 682-3147
Fax (702) 486-9908
ckorsgaard@doc.nv.gov
Address:
3955 W. Russell Rd.
Las Vegas, NV 89118
 
 
 

 
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